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Chris LoConti's avatar

Chris LoConti

Team Wyld

Points Total

  • 0 Today
  • 0 This Week
  • 1,482 Total

Participant Impact

  • up to
    5.1
    pounds
    food waste prevented
  • up to
    30
    meatless or vegan meals
    consumed
  • up to
    30
    zero-waste meals
    consumed
  • up to
    11
    pounds of CO2
    have been saved
  • up to
    1.0
    energy audits
    conducted
  • up to
    2,465
    minutes
    not spent in front of a screen
  • up to
    855
    gallons of water
    have been saved
  • up to
    2,465
    minutes
    spent outdoors
  • up to
    1,010
    minutes
    spent learning

Chris's Actions

Economy & Communities

Find out where your energy comes from

SDG #7 Energy

I will spend 30 minutes learning about where my energy comes from.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Understand Your Climate And Natural Disaster Risks

SDG #9 Industry & Infrastructure

I will spend 30 minutes learning about the climate and natural disaster risks in my area.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Make Zero-Waste Meals

SDG #2 Zero Hunger

I will cook 1 meal(s) with zero waste each day.

COMPLETED 30
DAILY ACTIONS

Education & Livelihood

Learn About The Education & Livelihood SDGs

SDG #4, 8, 11 & 17

I will spend 60 minutes learning about these SDGs.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Online Energy Audit

SDG #7 Energy

I will complete an online energy audit of my home, office, or dorm room and identify my next steps for saving energy.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Create A Readiness Plan

SDG #9 Industry & Infrastructure

I will develop a readiness plan for my household in the event of an emergency.

Completed
One-Time Action

Education & Livelihood

Plan A Staycation in Your Community

SDG #11 Communities

For an upcoming vacation, I will plan a staycation in my region.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Get Involved in the Water Justice Movement

SDG #6 Water & Sanitation

I will spend 45 minutes learning about water justice and find out how I can get involved in local initiatives.

Completed
One-Time Action

Climate & Ecosystems

Learn About Invasive Species

SDG #14 & 15

I will spend 60 minutes learning about invasive species and ways to reduce their impacts.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Take 5-Minute Or Less Showers

SDG #6 Water & Sanitation

I will save up to 6 gallons (23 L) of water each day by taking 5-minute showers. Tip: Use a timer to practice or count to 60 a few times.

COMPLETED 30
DAILY ACTIONS

Economy & Communities

Induction Cooking

SDG #7 Energy

I will spend 30 minutes learning about induction cooking and consider if I could add this to my food prep methods.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Mend Clothing

SDG #9 Industry & Infrastructure

I will mend a piece of clothing for myself, family or friends.

Completed
One-Time Action

Education & Livelihood

Research Impact Investing

SDG #8 Work & Economy

Using the links provided below, I will research impact investing or my current investment portfolio to determine if they align with my values.

Completed
One-Time Action

Health & Equity

Practice Mindfulness

SDG #3 Health & Well-Being

I will spend 10 minutes each day practicing mindfulness.

COMPLETED 30
DAILY ACTIONS

Health & Equity

Learn About Participation and Representation

SDG #5 Gender

I will spend at least 30 minutes learning more about the barriers to women and girl's equal participation and representation around the world.

Completed
One-Time Action

Health & Equity

Learn About Gender Diversity

SDG #5 Gender

I will spend 30 minutes learning about gender diversity.

Completed
One-Time Action

Health & Equity

Spend Time Outside

SDG #3 Health & Well-Being

I will replace 40 minute(s) per day typically spent inside (computer time, watching television, etc.) with quality time outside exercising, enjoying the sunrise/sunset, gardening, journaling, or practicing gratitude for nature.

COMPLETED 30
DAILY ACTIONS

Health & Equity

Support Indigenous & First Nations Communities

SDG #10 Reduced Inequalities

I will spend 30 learning about the past and present indigenous communities in my regions and what I can do to be supportive.

Completed
One-Time Action

Health & Equity

Safe Disposal of Medications and Household Chemicals

SDG #3 Health & Well-Being

I will spend 30 minutes learning about how and where to dispose of medications and chemicals properly.

Completed
One-Time Action

Health & Equity

Learn About Equitable Food Access

SDG #10 Reduced Inequalities

I will spend 30 minutes learning about equitable food access and how I can advocate for healthy and fresh food in my region.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Support A Renters Bills of Rights

SDG #1 No Poverty

Of nearly 44 million U.S. renter households in 2019, more than 45% paid rent equal to 30% or more of their gross household income. I will spend 30 minutes learning about a renters bill of rights and affordable housing.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Get To Know Your Watershed

SDG #6 Water & Sanitation

I will spend 30 minutes learning about my watershed and the particular water issues my region faces.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Reduce Animal Product Consumption

SDG #2 Zero Hunger

I will enjoy 1 meatless meal(s) and/or 1 vegan meal(s) each day this week.

COMPLETED 30
DAILY ACTIONS

Basic Needs & Security

Know Your Produce

SDG #2 Zero Hunger

I will visit ewg.org to learn about and use their Clean 15 and Dirty Dozen produce lists.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Calculate Your Water Footprint

SDG #6 Water & Sanitation

I will calculate my water footprint and look for a few ways I can reduce consumption or waste.

Completed
One-Time Action

Feed


  • Chris LoConti's avatar
    Chris LoConti 4/29/2022 1:53 PM
    Happy Friday!


    We had 150   team members join the challenge this year, here are some of the highlights from our collective impact:
    • Over 900 vegan & 350 zero-waste meals were consumed!
    • 550 hrs were spent not in front of screens!
    • 635 hrs were spent outdoors!
    • 1,000+ conservations were had focused on active listening!
    • 450 hrs were spent learning!
    • 12,000 gallons of water was saved!
      To visualize that, picture a round above-ground swimming pool: it's diameter would be 20 ft across and the pool would be 5 ft deep
    Thank you to everyone that participated! I hope that you were able to takeaway some useful info from the actions that you practiced throughout the month. It was a lot of fun deep-diving into some of the topics and reading your answers to the reflection questions in the Feed.

    Since there's one day left in the challenge, I'm going to announce prize winners on Monday so that all actions get accounted for.
    Have a great weekend everyone!
  • Reflection Question
    Economy & Communities Understand Your Climate And Natural Disaster Risks
    What are the climate and disaster risks in your region?

    Chris LoConti's avatar
    Chris LoConti 4/29/2022 1:07 PM
    The risk of forest fires in my region is ever-increasing. The PNW suffered devastating fires the past few years and they just seem to keep growing more intense each season, magnified as drought persists throughout much of the west coast.
    Flooding happens, earthquakes are possibility and closer to the coast tsunamis could be a threat.
  • Reflection Question
    Economy & Communities Find out where your energy comes from
    Where does the energy in your region come from? Which energy is a renewable source?

    Chris LoConti's avatar
    Chris LoConti 4/29/2022 1:04 PM
    I purchase renewable energy certificates through my local utility, Pacific Power; this year's energy mix was: 92% wind, 5% solar, 2% biomass, 1% geothermal. 

    Their base mix is: 51.44% coal, 19.47% natural gas, 11.32% wind, 5.13% hydro, 5.19% solar, 0.29% geothermal, 0.37% biomass, and 6.79% misc. -  so I feel like the RECs are a good investment to stimulate local green power production and reduce dependence on coal.
  • Reflection Question
    Health & Equity Learn About Participation and Representation
    What are some of the barriers that exist to women and girl's equitable participation or representation in your community? Do you experience these barriers?

    Chris LoConti's avatar
    Chris LoConti 4/28/2022 12:36 PM
    Poverty and Employment
    Women in Oregon experience high rates of poverty and multiple obstacles to obtaining work that pays a living wage. Over 60% of minimum wage jobs are held by women. Oregon is continuing to experience job polarization, with most jobs being created at the high-wage or low-wage levels. The Portland Metro areas and the Willamette Valley region have experienced the majority of the state’s economic growth, while rural areas have significantly lagged behind.
    Educational Attainment
    Higher-wage jobs tend to require a degree. Women in Oregon are outpacing men in educational attainment, but not in wages. On average, women make .88 cents on the dollar for work as compared to men. This number declines when we look at women of color: black women make $0.70 on the dollar and Latina women make $0.51. For many women, work is not a pathway out of poverty or towards self-sufficiency.
    Rising Child Care Costs
    Affordable quality child care is increasingly out of reach for most families. With the annual cost of child care exceeding the annual cost of college tuition, families are struggling to pay for quality care.
    Wealth and Assets 
    Wealth gaps have grown considerably after the recession. Many Oregonians depleted their savings and/or assets during the recession and have not been able to reestablish their financial foothold. Single female-headed households in Oregon have the second lowest wealth and asset accumulation in the country. The impacts of this extend over generations, perpetuating the cycle of poverty in many communities. 
  • Reflection Question
    Health & Equity Support Indigenous & First Nations Communities
    Why is it important to honor native and indigenous peoples and cultures? What have you learned that is important to you? If you identify with or are a member of an indigenous group, how does your community practice sustainability?

    Chris LoConti's avatar
    Chris LoConti 4/28/2022 12:31 PM
    What most people in this country know — or think they know — about Native Americans is rooted in myths, stereotypes and half-truths. Information they have received since birth from movies, television, the media and school lessons has created a false narrative (or commonly accepted story) about historic and contemporary Native Americans and tribes. From a young age, most people in the United States have been immersed in the current dominant narrative about Native peoples. It is a largely false and deficit-based narrative, meaning it focuses on challenges and weaknesses — real, assumed or exaggerated — rather than being based on strengths and opportunities. These narratives are almost always created by non-Native people, often with the intention to oppress Native nations, peoples and cultures.  The effects are profound. The negative, persistent narrative can harm the self-esteem and aspirations of Native Americans — especially children. It also reinforces negative stereotypes among non-Native people, shaping how they think and act. As individuals, our internalized biases, stereotypes, misunderstandings, ignorance and blind spots are all products of it. Our country has used the false narrative to justify oppressive practices and laws, and historic and systemic racism. 
    If we work to restore the narrative that has been erased, we will succeed in generating understanding about laws and policies that continue to devastate our Native world. That will lead to real change. The dominant American narrative dehumanizes, derides and objectifies Native people. The new narrative should tell the truth, the strength of their history, the power of their contemporary attainments, the resilience of their cultures, the continuance of their values. 
  • Reflection Question
    Education & Livelihood Learn About The Education & Livelihood SDGs
    What was a linking factor across this group of SDGs?

    Chris LoConti's avatar
    Chris LoConti 4/28/2022 10:47 AM
    I read through this paper on the topic and found this excerpt spot on: " "Because many of the effects of basic education are intergenerational, the inequities of one generation are visited upon the next." Maternal education benefits sons and daughters alike. Literacy is closely linked to strong school completion rates. "Rural Origin" is noted as a factor in student performance. Education may assist in the redistribution of of income, the relationship between attainment and earnings is very complex."
  • Reflection Question
    Health & Equity Learn About Gender Diversity
    Why is equity for gender diverse individuals important for a just and sustainable society?

    Chris LoConti's avatar
    Chris LoConti 4/27/2022 5:11 PM
    Gender equity is not just the concern of a portion of the world’s population; it is a human right, a concern for us all, because no society can develop – economically, politically, or socially – when a significant portion of its population is marginalized. We must leave no one behind.
  • Reflection Question
    Health & Equity Learn About Equitable Food Access
    How is food equity and access linked to a sustainable future?

    Chris LoConti's avatar
    Chris LoConti 4/27/2022 5:07 PM
    The effects of food-insecurity on children and families spill into their everyday lives, including time spent at school and work and their overall health. Residents who live in food deserts—neighborhoods with few or limited access to healthy food sources—are more likely to be people of color. Individuals living in food deserts also tend to have lower levels of education, earn lower incomes, and are more likely to be unemployed. As summer approaches, 15 million children living in food-insecure households will no longer have access to the daily lunches they receive at school, as their households’ low wages make it difficult to afford healthy food options. In addition, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, or USDA, the effects of climate change are threatening the nation’s food supply, with increased occurrences of droughts and wildfires that may affect the cost of food in the future and disproportionately harm low-income communities and communities of color.
    Leaders at the local and state levels should follow the examples of successful community initiatives to improve the U.S. food system.
  • Reflection Question
    Economy & Communities Create A Readiness Plan
    What was it like to create a readiness plan? Did you find other resources you could share?

    Chris LoConti's avatar
    Chris LoConti 4/27/2022 5:02 PM
    Our camping gear was pretty well-suited to align with a readiness plan. We have things prepped like: emergency blankets, warm clothes, gloves, handwarmers, 2 - 1 gallon water jugs, dehydrated camp food, solar chargers, headlamps, etc. 
    Only a few ways out of Corvallis so depending on the emergency our options are limited but I'm grateful to have the basic supplies ready to go in the event of an evacuation.
  • Reflection Question
    Basic Needs & Security Get Involved in the Water Justice Movement
    Who is affected by water insecurity in your region? How are they affected? How are you impacted by water insecurity?

    Chris LoConti's avatar
    Chris LoConti 4/27/2022 4:56 PM
    The Oregon Water Futures Project is a collaboration between the University of Oregon, water and environmental justice interests, Indigenous peoples, communities of color, and low-income communities across Oregon. It was formed in response to disparities in the distribution of and access to water resources and water decision-making for Native and Indigenous peoples, people of color, migrants and low-income communities.

    Their report found that communities of color are disproportionately affected by water inequity and that access to clean, drinkable water across Oregon is becoming unreliable.