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Niamh Bratrude's avatar

Niamh Bratrude

South Whidbey Elementary School-LaVassar 5th Grade Science

Points Total

  • 0 Today
  • 0 This Week
  • 421 Total

Participant Impact

  • up to
    14
    pounds
    food waste prevented
  • up to
    80
    zero-waste meals
    consumed
  • up to
    29
    pounds of CO2
    have been saved
  • up to
    1.0
    energy audits
    conducted
  • up to
    1,080
    gallons of water
    have been saved
  • up to
    12
    hours
    volunteered
  • up to
    746
    minutes
    spent learning

Niamh's Actions

Economy & Communities

Carry My Trash

SDG #12 Consumption & Production

I will carry all of my unrecyclable, non-compostable trash with me each day to raise my awareness of how much waste I produce.

COMPLETED 20
DAILY ACTIONS

Economy & Communities

Learn About & Practice Sustainable Fashion

SDG #12 Consumption & Production

Each day, I will spend 23 minutes learning about sustainable fashion so that I can engage in this practice.

COMPLETED 17
DAILY ACTIONS

Economy & Communities

Learn About The Economy & Communities SDGs

SDG #7, 9 & 12

I will spend 12 minutes learning about these SDGs.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Find out where your energy comes from

SDG #7 Energy

I will spend 12 minutes learning about where my energy comes from.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Choose Clean/Renewable Energy

SDG #7 Energy

I will sign up for my utility company's clean/renewable energy option.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Understand Your Climate And Natural Disaster Risks

SDG #9 Industry & Infrastructure

I will spend 1 minutes learning about the climate and natural disaster risks in my area.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Create A Readiness Plan

SDG #9 Industry & Infrastructure

I will develop a readiness plan for my household in the event of an emergency.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Online Energy Audit

SDG #7 Energy

I will complete an online energy audit of my home, office, or dorm room and identify my next steps for saving energy.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Induction Cooking

SDG #7 Energy

I will spend 23 minutes learning about induction cooking and consider if I could add this to my food prep methods.

Completed
One-Time Action

Economy & Communities

Mend Clothing

SDG #9 Industry & Infrastructure

I will mend a piece of clothing for myself, family or friends.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Learn About the Basic Needs & Security SDGs

SDG #1, 2 & 6

I will spend 120 minutes learning about these SDGs.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Volunteer

SDG #1 No Poverty

In my community, I will volunteer at a community shelter, food pantry or soup kitchen.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Support A Renters Bills of Rights

SDG #1 No Poverty

Of nearly 44 million U.S. renter households in 2019, more than 45% paid rent equal to 30% or more of their gross household income. I will spend 222 minutes learning about a renters bill of rights and affordable housing.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Get To Know Your Watershed

SDG #6 Water & Sanitation

I will spend 120 minutes learning about my watershed and the particular water issues my region faces.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Take 5-Minute Or Less Showers

SDG #6 Water & Sanitation

I will save up to 6 gallons (23 L) of water each day by taking 5-minute showers. Tip: Use a timer to practice or count to 60 a few times.

COMPLETED 20
DAILY ACTIONS

Basic Needs & Security

Practice A Sharing Economy

SDG #1 No Poverty

Each day, I will engage in a sharing economy among my family, friends, and neighbors.

COMPLETED 20
DAILY ACTIONS

Basic Needs & Security

Get Involved in the Water Justice Movement

SDG #6 Water & Sanitation

I will spend 100 minutes learning about water justice and find out how I can get involved in local initiatives.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Make Zero-Waste Meals

SDG #2 Zero Hunger

I will cook 6 meal(s) with zero waste each day.

COMPLETED 17
DAILY ACTIONS

Basic Needs & Security

Know Your Produce

SDG #2 Zero Hunger

I will visit ewg.org to learn about and use their Clean 15 and Dirty Dozen produce lists.

Completed
One-Time Action

Basic Needs & Security

Calculate Your Water Footprint

SDG #6 Water & Sanitation

I will calculate my water footprint and look for a few ways I can reduce consumption or waste.

Completed
One-Time Action

Feed


  • Niamh Bratrude's avatar
    Niamh Bratrude 4/21/2022 9:58 AM

  • Niamh Bratrude's avatar
    Niamh Bratrude 4/21/2022 9:57 AM
    I am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserII am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loservI am a loser am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loserI am a loser

  • Niamh Bratrude's avatar
    Niamh Bratrude 4/20/2022 7:08 PM
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  • Niamh Bratrude's avatar
    Niamh Bratrude 4/20/2022 7:07 PM
    show updates from my team 
    Reflection, encouragement, and relationship building are all important aspects of getting a new habit to stick.
    Share thoughts, encourage others, and reinforce positive new habits on the Feed.

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    Niamh Bratrude's avatar NIAMH BRATRUDE 4/20/2022 11:10 AM
    College of Osteopathic Medicine
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    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
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    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
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    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
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    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Home
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
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    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Current Fellows
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
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    Faculty»
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    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
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    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
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    Residency & Fellowships»
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    Home
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    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
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    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
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    Faculty»
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    Home
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    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
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    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
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    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
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    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
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    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
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    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 4882
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    Niamh Bratrude's avatar NIAMH BRATRUDE 4/20/2022 10:46 AM
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    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

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    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
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    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
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    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Contact Us
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Home
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    Patient Care»
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    Patient Forms
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Contact Us
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
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    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824
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    I will stay at my house this summer
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    Would you consider using an induction cooking surface? If you have used one before, what do you like about induction cooking?
    Soren Ringsrud's avatar SOREN RINGSRUD 4/19/2022 8:01 PM
    Using magnets to cook wooooow!!
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    I HATE PEOPLE. THERE SO RUDE!!!!!!
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    don't litter in watersheds
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    Aurora Downey's avatar AURORA DOWNEY 4/13/2022 9:26 PM
    i loved being outside it was fun

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    My assigned seat is right next to bodan and he is soooo annoying. He will literally NOT SHUT UP!!
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    I am a big nerd but i think its cool or .................................................

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    EMO !'s avatar EMO ! 4/19/2022 8:09 AM
    uuuuum?
    EMO !'s avatar EMO ! 4/19/2022 8:09 AM
    ...
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    Are you guys having a good day? im sure not my new assighn seat is next to will...whyyyyyyy

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    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
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    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
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    RESEARCH
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    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
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    Home
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
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    News
    Contact Us
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    INPEP»
    Home
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    Home
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
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    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
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    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
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    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
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    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
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    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
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    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
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    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
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    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
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    EMG/NCS
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    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
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    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
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    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
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    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
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    News
    Contact Us
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
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    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 4882
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    Niamh Bratrude's avatar NIAMH BRATRUDE 4/20/2022 10:46 AM
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    Home
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
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    News
    Contact Us
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    Home
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    Home
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    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
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    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
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    Faculty»
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    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
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    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

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    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824
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    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Home
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    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Home
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
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    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
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    Faculty»
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    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
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    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
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    RESEARCH
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    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
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    Home
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
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    News
    Contact Us
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    INPEP»
    Home
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    Home
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
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    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
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    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
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    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
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    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
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    Home
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    Patient Forms
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
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    Academics»
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    Faculty»
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    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
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    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
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    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
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    Academics»
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    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
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    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
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    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
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    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 4882
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
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    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
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    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
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    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
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    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
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    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
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    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Home
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    Home
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    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
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    Home
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824
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    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
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    INPEP»
    Home
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    Home
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
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    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
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    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Home
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
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    INPEP»
    Home
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    Residency & Fellowships»
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    Home
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
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    RESEARCH
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    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
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    Home
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    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
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    Faculty»
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    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
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    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
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    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
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    Apply
    Calendar
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    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
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    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
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    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
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    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
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    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 4882
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    Niamh Bratrude's avatar NIAMH BRATRUDE 4/20/2022 10:46 AM
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    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
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    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
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    Contact Us
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
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    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
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    Home
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    Apply
    Calendar
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    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
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    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
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    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824
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    QUESTION
     EDUCATION & LIVELIHOOD PLAN A STAYCATION IN YOUR COMMUNITY
    What place in your region are you most excited to visit during your staycation?
    Soren Ringsrud's avatar SOREN RINGSRUD 4/19/2022 8:03 PM
    I will stay at my house this summer
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    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

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    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
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    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

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    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
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    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
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    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
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    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
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    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
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    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
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    Home
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    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
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    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
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    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
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    Contact Us
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    Apply
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    Home
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    Home
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    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
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    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
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    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Current Fellows
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    TWITTER
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    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
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    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
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    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
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    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
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    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Home
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    Patient Forms
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
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    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
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    Apply
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    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
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    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
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    Academics»
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    Faculty»
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    INPEP»
    Home
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    Residency & Fellowships»
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    Home
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    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
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    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 4882

  • Niamh Bratrude's avatar
    Niamh Bratrude 4/20/2022 10:46 AM
    College of Osteopathic Medicine
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    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
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    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
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    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
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    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
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    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
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    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
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    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

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    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
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    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824College of Osteopathic Medicine
    College of Human Medicine
    Search form
    Search
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY & OPHTHALMOLOGY
    Home
    About»
    Message from the Chair
    News
    Contact Us
    Directions
    Giving Opportunities
    Academics»
    Conference Offerings
    Neurology Clerkship
    Student Electives
    Academic Website Links
    Faculty»
    Faculty Directory
    Fellow Directory
    News and Announcements
    Research»
    Clinical Studies
    Concussion
    Epilepsy
    INPEP»
    Home
    Core Faculty & Associates
    News
    Contact Us
    Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Neuropathology Research Core Laboratory
    Translational Neurology
    Residency & Fellowships»
    Residency»
    Home
    Program Information
    Apply
    Calendar
    Current Residents
    Past Resident Graduates
    Fellowships»
    Home
    Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship
    Epilepsy Fellowship
    Interventional Neurology Fellowship
    Neuroepidemiology Fellowship
    Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship
    Vascular Neurology Fellowship
    Current Fellows
    Past Fellowship Graduates
    Consortium of Osteopathic Residencies in Ophthalmology (CORO)»
    Home
    CORO Resident Directory
    Conference Offerings
    Patient Care»
    Patient Care Home
    Patient Forms
    Medication Refill Policy
    Clinical Testing/Procedures»
    Electroencephalogram (EEG)
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    Neuropsychological Testing
    EMG/NCS
    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
    Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)
    Directions
    Seminars for Patients
    Helpful Links
    Flash Electroretinogram (ERG)
    What does it do?
    A Flash ERG (FERG) is a test which measures the electrical response of the eye’s light-sensitive cells (rods and cones). It also checks other cell layers in the retina.

    Why did my doctor order this test?
    A FERG will give your doctor information about the cells in your retina which give you color vision, detailed contrast detection, night vision and peripheral vision.

    How is the test done?
    Patients are seated comfortably in a recliner (if they choose), their pupils are dilated with eye drops, and they remain in a darkened room for about 45 minutes. After the 45 minutes, the patient’s eyes are numbed with an anesthetic eye drop and then a contact lens electrode is placed on the eye. Another wire is placed on the top of the head. The patient will look at a series of different colored flashes of light as the electrode picks up the retinal response. No response is required from the patient.

    How should I prepare for the test?
    If you wear contact lenses, be sure to bring your lens case and solution. You cannot wear contacts during the test. You should not wear any eye makeup to your test. Your hair should be clean and dry at the time of the test with no hairspray, gel or oil in your hair that may interfere with our ability to get a good recording from the scalp electrode. If you have difficulty driving when dilated, you will need to arrange for a driver. You may wish to bring your sunglasses to the appointment to wear after the test.

    QUICK LINKS
    PATIENT FORMS
    CONTACT US
    DIRECTIONS
    DIRECTORY
    CONFERENCE OFFERINGS
    FOR RESIDENTS AND STAFF ONLY - LOGIN
    WAYS TO BECOME INVOLVED
    FACEBOOK
    INSTAGRAM
    TWITTER
    GIVING OPPORTUNITIES
    DEPARTMENT RESOURCES
    EVENTS
    ACADEMICS
    PATIENT CARE
    RESEARCH
    DIRECTIONS
    CONTACT US
    PATIENTS: CLINIC PHONE: (517) 353-8122
    CLINIC FAX: (517) 432-3713
    ACADEMICS: ACADEMIC OFFICE: (517) 432-9277
    ACADEMIC FAX: (517) 432-9414
    E-MAIL: MSUNEUROLOGY@HT.MSU.EDU
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
    DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY
    CLINICAL CENTER
    804 SERVICE ROAD, ROOM A-217
    EAST LANSING, MI 48824

    Michigan State University
    Developed by DECS | Contact Information | Privacy Statement | Site Accessibility

    MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer

    © Michigan State University Board of Trustees, East Lansing, MI 48824

  • Niamh Bratrude's avatar
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  • Niamh Bratrude's avatar
    Niamh Bratrude 4/20/2022 10:40 AM
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